PHARMACOKINETICS: Essential Theory and Practical Considerations

Enhance your appreciation and understanding of pharmacokinetics by attending this unique three-day course in Nova Scotia’s charming and historic Annapolis Valley.

THE COURSE IN CONTEXT

As every scientist in the pharmaceutical industry knows, the pharmacokinetics of a drug┬ámust be thoroughly studied before it has any chance of reaching the pharmacists’ shelves.

Early clinical trials are undertaken primarily to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters characteristic of each new pharmacological entity. The applications of pharmacokinetics, of course, extend beyond research and development to routine clinical practice where clinical pharmacokinetics is utilized in devising individualized dosing regimens, particularly for chronically administered drugs with low therapeutic indices.

Given its importance in drug research and its relevance to modern drug marketing, it is imperative that key scientific, clinical and marketing staff members within the innovative pharmaceutical industry have at least a basic understanding of the science of pharmacokinetics.

Highly regarded by hundreds of former attendees from both the pharmaceutical industry and government agencies, this popular course has been presented at various venues internationally (Canada, the USA, the U.K. and Brazil) since 1987.

FOR WHOM INTENDED

This course will be of particular interest to pharmaceutical scientists, pharmacists, toxicologists, physicians and clinical / regulatory personnel from the pharmaceutical and allied industries and government regulatory agencies.

Of course, pharmacokinetics (toxicokinetics) has numerous applications in the biomedical sciences generally. For example, this course is also of special relevance to those engaged in emergency and forensic toxicology (viz. “forensic pharmacokinetics”, a term introduced in respect to alcohol in an early paper by Dr. Mullen).

PARTIAL COURSE CONTENTS

  • Physico-chemical determinants of drug disposition
  • Kinetics of drug absorption, distribution & elimination (“ADME”)
  • First order rate constants and half-life
  • Nonlinear (Michaelis-Menten) pharmacokinetics
  • Apparent volume of distribution
  • Clearance concepts
  • First-pass effects
  • Area under concentration-time curves (“AUC” in exposure assessment)
  • Compartmental models (including criteria for choosing the “best” model)
  • Elements of “PBPK” modeling & its comparison with empirical modeling
  • Steady-state concepts (multiple dosing)
  • Bioavailability & bioequivalence
  • Noncompartmental analysis (mean residence times, etc.)
  • Fraction absorbed (Wagner-Nelson) plots
  • Drug metabolism (biotransformation) including the role of key CYP450 enzymes
  • Drug protein binding
  • Causes of pharmacokinetic variability
  • Toxicokinetics
  • Pharmacokinetics computer programs

(Note: This course requires no special mathematics prerequisite.)

PRINCIPAL INSTRUCTOR > Peter W. Mullen, Ph.D.

SUMMER VENUE

June 27 – 29, 2017
Acadia University (click HERE to visit Acadia University’s website)
Wolfville
Nova Scotia
Canada B0P 1X0

REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE